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The Significance of Cross-Verification of Reviewed Past Lives - Athanasios Komianos

There is a tendency for the majority of professionals in regression therapy to overlook the importance of the association between revealed and relived experiences and real events. There are two major reasons for this. First, pioneers of our profession argue that what is essential and vital for our clients, is to achieve emotional relief and catharsis and to alleviate the presenting problem. If this goal is accomplished it should be of no interest to the therapist whether the client is imagining things or truly reliving a past life experience. Second, there are difficulties associated with the verification of the reviewed experiences compared to those of historical reality. How can one trace down events if the story is rooted far in the past when no proper records were kept? Also, we all know that most of our clients reveal emotional material, not names, dates, or historical details. This argumentation is sound and reasonable, and by leaving verification aside, the therapist is thus dispensed from credibility concerns and this makes his work easier.


However, a further issue complicates things a little more: our clients’ personal view about their regressions. We all know that our clients have doubt about their own experiences. They question themselves about the reality of what they see or feel. The idea of reincarnation is foreign to them. They were never taught about it. “Is this all in my mind?”, or “did I make all this up?” are prevailing thoughts, especially for those who have two or three regressions (the average number of sessions for our clients). The natural tendency of an inquisitive human mind is to doubt the reality of these experiences (even for believers in reincarnation). Now when we, as therapists, are posing the question “…why did your imagination make up such a horrible story where you were a slave with a degraded life; you were condemned as a witch by the inquisition, and burned at the stake?” The answer is usually “hmm”… “Hmm” may be interpreted in a number of ways, but it seems to me that it symbolizes a wondering puzzlement. How could one validate a story without names, dates and places?   Is there a way out of this? For me there is. But let me first share with you a few cases before I expand theoretically.



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